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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
was not to convert them, but to educate them. and to improve their lives and tangible ways because that's what they responded to positively. once he had the inside, he had what became the greatest university of her release. >> isn't still open? >> it is. it weathered many tech theories, but it remains open and stay that way. >> who owns it, who rents it? >> it is still run by a very impressive faculty of professors and administrators who are middle easterners and american. daniel liss and peter gorman who is a psychologist by training and shared with the important departments at the university of chicago before he took the shot of a couple years ago. >> is it coincidental uses direct consignment was that on purpose? >> he has a personal passion for the school because of his family connections. >> i can come in the american university, or who runs the? >> faculty air missile easterners. the vast majority of students. >> is it associated with religion, another school? >> is deliberately secular nonsectarian. >> what does it cost to go their four-year? >> i have no idea. >> what would it cost and
morning. thank you for educating people on your television show. we live in a community where we are experiencing exactly what you're talking about, particularly businesses, and i am talking big businesses. they do not like where the doors are located, or this department over here, and what they are doing is restricting jobs and tax base. i would encourage people to get involved in your institute and fight this because it is not doing anything for the economy or our country. merry christmas to everybody. host: john, thank you for the call. what is the history of the cato institute, founded in 1977? guest: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking that if you follow all of the problems come at the end of the trail you will find the smiling grin
education than, -- and tanzania is similar to thailand in 1972 and soon we will see african countries doing good. this is wonderful. our problems are solved w know what works and we will be rich. >>guest: no, we have this problem with two billion human beings in poverty. i did most of my research in the poor part of the world. all poor people are clever otherwise they would be died. if you are poor and stupid, you die. >> they don't have rule of law? >>guest: they don't have rule of law or access to credit and they are locked in a vicious circle poverty. it takes a small investment to get them out of that. to me it shows the aptitude of people. when a young couple decide t grab if the kingdom and to have two children, they invest in the children and they take off. we have two-child families from here and onward. the world is governed from that. it is not the big corporations or banks that run the economy, it is the young couple who decide to work. >> when they are educated with wealth they . >> are helpful. this fantastic investment in vaccinations that helps so do you not have a kid who is
powell. [applause] we are thrilled to have our local and national education and safety leaders here to discuss the promise neighborhood program and how we promote safety in our schools. i have been a principal and excited and delighted principal in this community for 80 years. i know how hard families work a day in and day out to achieve academically support each other and the community and to make sure our children have six classrooms, said playgrounds -- safe classrooms, safe playgrounds, and save homes to welcome them. this school has been a proud a partner of the thomas neighborhood initiative. i realize some of our struggling students addressing these challenges in the class term alone was not going to be enough to help get them on the path to success and achieve what we know they are capable of in the future. we need to work with a broader coalition of partners to address their needs outside of the classroom, in the home, on the streets in the community. i am so thankful to our founder. [applause] for starting this hard work, they have continued the hard work over the past yea
evadetors. missing money that could have a tax impact on education. >> when question come back, it seems to be a mystery of the universe. we'll show you your own personal best option. >> with most cell phone contracts lasting 2 year, many consumers want to make sure they get the carrier that deliver the best quality for the lowest price. no one service fits all. >> reporter: who has the best mobile phone service? >> verizon. >> at&t. >> metro pcs. >> we never tell anybody. >> reporter: bill moore can help. uses only store bought unmodified thongs indoors and outside and while driving. >> we put software on it that helps automate test. the test we run are calls and up load and download data test. >> reporter: employees travel around the nation recording the data and transferring it to free maps you can access. that general information is not specific to how you use your phone. >> for some people, all they want that phone for is for calling. other people all they care about is data services. if i'm a teenage, i probably only care about texting. >> reporter: there's a free metrics app f
education. joining me now, ceo of grand save. i think this is an amazing idea. tell us how it works, just the basics. >>nto having me on the show. so, parents register their child on grad save, and they an fill out a description. the upload a pictre, and then you can share their dedicated url with friends and family. friends and family know that they can contribute directly to child's savings plan. gerri: it really starts with mom and dad who set this thing up. it is away for everybody to give to the kids' education. i think this is brilliant, and until you why. here is how much to a spin on holiday cards. what a waste of money. i mean, look at that. you have nnot know much money -- how much money never even gets used? but if rickey use that money instd for something that is really needed linkage among the school. it seems to me to be just eight such -- much more debt idea. you factor in the idea that the cost of college is just going through this guy. the earlier you start the better it is. >> absolutely right. experts agree that earlier eighth child get started with a savings account, e
to be assigned, but he also wanted to exposes them to a european education into the world of international affairs in the world of diplomacy. and they went to sea with benjamin franklin and benjamin franklin's lavish chÂteau outside paris at the time and john quincy adams went to a french school with benjamin franklin's grandson. within several, he was speaking french folly. he was a gifted child. by the time he was 15 he could speak four languages fought late, had rd studied latin and greek. he was so gifted in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really vent
to do before. c-span: how much education did your father have? >> guest: he never went to college. he went to high school in pasadena. his father had found someone to manage the ranch, eventually, and the family had moved to pasadena. c-span: pasadena--what state? >> guest: california. c-span: california. >> guest: and my father went through high school in pasadena and he had wanted to go to stanford, and it was at the time of world war i, and two things happened. my father was drafted briefly before the end of world war i, although he never saw military action because it ended. and his father died. and my father was sent out to the ranch to try to keep the lid on things... c-span: how much education... >> guest: ... while the estate was settled. c-span: i'm sorry. how much education did your mother have? >> guest: my mother had a degree from the university of arizona, and she had taught school, grade school, i think, for a while in el paso. c-span: so when did you--given that atmosphere at that ranch and all the newspapers and magazines coming out, when did you begin to form your own
prevention. we also believe parents need to be educating their kids and talking to kids about appropriate sexual behaviors to assure all of the young people in philadelphia are prepared when they think about having sex for the first time. we believe that our role is to assure that as partners for parents, we provide what young people may need if they're going to act responsibly in terms of sexual relations. >> you talk about education and i just want to throw out numbers. 25% of new hiv infections in philadelphia alone are teenagers. 15% of philadelphia students say they weren't taught about hiv or aids in school. some might argue maybe more education might be the answer, not condoms. >> we don't think it's one or the other. we think most are important. we're including education not only in schools but also include the internet and we're providing condoms as we've been doing now for more than a year in a number of locations throughout the city for young people. >> let's talk a little bit about the program. tell me a little bit about how it will work, because the part that i sort of took t
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has grown. these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for it. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and you have to do battle with th
on issues of design and access control and training for students and educators alike that the group could, said could be tailored by any school to suit its% individual needs. lou. lou: james, the two sides in this gun control debate, are now, if you will forgive the expression, they're arme up and going at it and getting ready for major confrontation. is there any compromise available in this, in this debate? >> as with the fiscal cliff it doesn't appear readily discernable, lou. president obama released a video message vowing to fight for new gun control laws early next year. the down tours of this debate are already taking shape as leading democrats are pressing for renewed assault weapons ban and for new limit on semitick ammunition magazines. a leading senate democrat says she favored schools being allowed to have armed guards if they so choose but she then cited the columbine massacre. >> in fact ere were two armed law enforcement officers who twice engaged the shooters at column bind. that didn't prevent 15 from being killed and 23 wounded. >> however opponents of the assault weapon
higher. >> wages have not kept up with inflation nor have they kept up with, in terms of education and amount of --. neil: maybe they haven't kept up with reality and those jobs going overseas? >> no, corporations turned to the service sector and cut was and cut benefits. we've seen stagnant wages. unions are the last defen ainst corporate republic has incredible political power and economic power more than it should have. we don't have good representation in government. neil: professor, you teach this in your classes. if i were in yo class you would fail me. >> absolutely not. students look at data they reach their own conclusions and often look at union data and reach the conclusion that it is a backstop between american woers being paid a living wage and not being paid a living wage. >> you know it interesting that you would bring that up because, that is probably how this particular argument got started the problem was that is got started in 1960 when ports were becoming more automated. the crux of this particular fight is about a royalty that was going to unions to compensate
real innovative and creative with what they're doing in education. we see what they've done in florida to create more choices. in louisiana particularly. forced by hurricane katrina to start a new system, in effect, and they see that more choices and students for parents to choose are helping low-income at-risk kids, minority kids. we can see it working. and it's not political. it's an american idea to give parents more choices to put their children in an environment that they can succeed. it's an idea that works. we can look around the country at states that try to create a more business-friendly environment, not because they're for businesses or for any political reason or they're for special interests, but they know the only way to get jobs and prosperity and create opportunity is to create an environment where businesses can thrive. we make it political here. and we ask our constituents to make choices between employers and employees. but states like texas have created a business-friendly environment with lower taxes and less regulation. they've passed some laws that reduce the ris
it, and prove it, but, however, i believe in the next stage that you will see more education to some laws and something, this should not have happened. >> reporter: doesn't look like any media appearances from john or the family just yet. they really want to get him back home, to their home in florida as soon as they can and it looks like it will have to be by car, john isn't in any condition to fly, they say. it took immense u.s. media coverage and pressure from the state department to get the mexican authorities to drop all charges against him. in the end they determined while it was illegal for him to have taken the gun into the the country, he never intended to commit a crime and it appears with the pressure of the the state department, and something of a face-saving compromise for the mexicans in order to get him released. jamie, back to you. >> jamie: on this one, dominic, chained to that bed for four months, that's a crime. we're so happy that johnnie will be home with his family where he belongs and i hope his health holds up, wish him the best. thank you, dominic. >> report
or nothing guy, and kennedy gets the picture. it's part of the education with kennedy. what i like about kennedy is he was raw and green, but he learned on the ground. he was bullied at the vienna summit, a rough summer with berlin, but he learned, and by the time of the cuban missile crisis in 1962, he's a great president. listen to the tapes of the missile crisis, and i have for a book i wrote on bobby kennedy, after the tapes, kennedy sounds great. president kennedy, particularly on the last day, the 13th day everybody's getting nervous, you hear voices getting squeaky, president kennedy is cool understanding we need a deal, russians, secretly, but have to make a deal with them, and thank god there was a couple years to learn on the job, and because he did in the end handle the crisis well. some of the education came from president eisenhower. anybody else? thank you very much. [applause] >>> for more information visit the author's website at evanthomasbooks.com. >> booktv on location at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, maryland interviews professors who a also authors. we are joi
have to do this in schools. i think local education decisions are best made at the local level. you know, we're going to have a very spirited discussion in congress, in the beginning of next year. we need to look at all of the issues, because what wayne lapierre and the president of the united states agree on, is that in this country, we have a culture of violence. and, i don't think -- >> that is really -- >> a culture of violence. >> chris: and also, also the president -- not saying he's right or wrong but he believes there is a need for tighter gun control, would you support it or not. >> i'm a strong supporter of our 2nd amendment rights. i want to find real solutions. i want to find real solutions that work and washington is not necessarily the place that you will find those solutions. they will be found in our families and in our faith and communities and medicine and health care. >> senator -- >> those are the problems. >> senator conrad, what do you think of what wayne lapierre had to say, are there any gun controls you would support? >> well, i already have. i voted for an
washington. there is so much to be done on jobs, income, education, and energy. we are a week away from one of the worst tragedies in memory. so we have got work to do on gun safety. a host of other issues. these are all challenges we can meet. these are all colleges we have to meet, if we want our kids to grow up in america that is full of opportunity and possibility, as much opportunity and possibility that our parents and our grandparents left for us. but we are only going to be able to do it together. we are going to have to find some common ground. the challenge we have got right now is that the american people are a lot more sensible and a lot more thoughtful, and much more willing to compromise and give and sacrifice and act responsibly, than their elected representatives are. that is a problem. there is a mismatch between how everybody else is thinking about these problems, democrats and republicans up side of this town, and how folks are acting here. we have to get the aligned. and we only have 10 days to do that. i hope every member of congress is thinking about that. nobody can g
told us about welfare? nothing. what has he told us about his education plan? nothing. the fact is he has got absolutely nothing to offer except for the same old something for nothing culture that got us in this mess in the first place. >> a democratic society -- will the prime minister -- >> order, order. members must now come down. -- calm down. it is the questions and the answers must be heard. therefore seek assurances from the commissioner of the metropolitan police that no stone will be left unturned in getting to the full truth about allegations that a police officer suffocated evidence against a member of the cabinet? >> let me say, at christmastime, it is right to pay tribute to break police officers, men and women who look after us around the clock and do an extremely good job. but the point my honorable friend has made is important. a police officer posing as a member of the public and sending an e-mail to blacken the name of a cabinet minister is a serious issue and needs to be investigated. the metropolitan police service truth of this matter as quick as complaints commis
products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get th
that are on the top are states that educate their young people, states that have taken the issue of obesity and exercise very seriously. the states on the bottom tend to be poorer states but that is not mutually exclusive because you have states like oklahoma and alabama, who have actually moved up in the rankings. so the issue is one of education. accessibility to the better foods, supermarkets coming into neighborhoods. for instance, in certain neighborhoods, there's really a lack of green groceries and mrs. obama has shed a lot of light on that subject, to our credit. and i think that was we go along and we come to understand these are very expensive issues, i mean, obesity costs us $190 billion a year. that is an incredible amount of money, and the other way to look at it is, we use about 1.1 billion gallons, extra of gas lane, owing to obesity. 1% of the gasoline we use is related to obesity. >> heather: it is just not mon taylor, that it is costing. it also costs us in lost time and also lost productivity. >> exactly. but the real problem with obesity is childhood obesity. and we have
. people can go to her digital archives now uncertain. on the educational portion of our website, we have a whole website where they come to life and you get to do activities on him. you can actually come to our research room. some people still come to our research room. >> so the word accessible does come to mind? >> absolutely. >> by the way, you should really appreciate what this guy did. anybody who has ever had to work with research materials, above all tape recordings of offers conversations of any kind, maybe has appreciation of what horrible drudgery it is to go through this. on behalf of history, ted, thank you very much for all you have done. i want you to explain something more about the system. particularly the way it was set up in the cabinet room, the oval office, at least. at least one telephone. describe it. there was a switch in the knee part of the desk. >> i will answer your question. but like answer your question. the lifetime, also like to intimate my thanks to this great library for what it has done. the library could not have been more supportive at every level, beg
in cilicia, educated strictly according to our ancestral law, being zealous about god. >> the apostle paul is, next to jesus, clearly the most intriguing figure of the first century of christianity and far better known than jesus caus he wrote all of those letters. >> ( dramatized ): for as long as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the lord's death until he comes. wait for his son from heaven, whom he raised from the dead. whatever is hobl
. lawmakers and top educators fired back. they say any solution also needs to include gun control and mental health care. >> i don't believe that the only way to stop violence by guns is to give the other person a gun. >> -- have acknowledged that armed police officers may be a part of the solution, but also add that's going to cost money and wouldn't necessarily prevent another shooting like last week's tragedy in newtown from happening again. either way, this debate is sure to heat up. more than 400,000 americans have already signed online petitions calling for gun control and president obama has promised to seek legislation next year. reporting live in washington, i'm danielle lee, larry, back to you. >> many thanks. we appreciate the update. >>> now, we had cnn's -- >> i honestly don't understand why you would rather have people be victims of a crime than be able to defend themselves. it's incomprehensible. >> you're unbelievably stupid man, aren't you? >> it seems to me that you're morally obtuse. you seem to prefer being a victim to being able to prevail over the criminal element. and
is at st. john's in annapolis, loving it. >> he does not take after his father -- a classical education, books? >> when he was five or six he was writing his own histories of medieval warfare. i stayed back. we played a wonderful video game, age of kings. you build your own castles and -- i let him play as much as he wanted to. he took to reading. he loves history, faulkner, he is a reader. so i just stand back. he will go wherever he goes. >> what about the 1980's -- what kind of work did you do then? >> at a certain point, after factories and bartending, my father had been an employee at a japanese company and outside of boston. he had moved up to vice president to president with no equity and a share stock. my brother and i had worked there in high school in the factory. the company made steam valves and big heavy iron casting for steam traps on oil lines or submarines. it was light manufacturing, but dirty, dusty, and that is what a summer job consisted of. my brother is older -- he came out of the army and went in as jr. purchasing clerk. sometime in the late 1970's i had had an of
is not just about selling tools. it's about getting experience and education, sharing ideas about woodworking. here and in other parts of the building, virtually every exhibitor and a group of 16 different woodworkers are putting on classes throughout the weekend sharing their years and years of knowledge and experience. phillips: you know what? i've always learned -- one good idea a day makes you a great woodworker. and here you can get dozens of great ideas. you better be prepared to take notes. and there's a guy here john sindelar, his tool collection is staggering. i mean, he has tools from the ancient pyramid for goodness' sake. -it goes way back. -shanesy: it's unbelievable. you know he came by just a minute ago and told me that in his traveling museum which is here on the show floor today, there's over $1 million worth of collectible tools. phillips: well over that. so, that's where we're heading right now. steve, keep this show going. keep making it stronger every year. and since he is the editor of the magazine, he really knows his stuff, and he's a woodworker, to
their educational development and development as adults? >> well, we have great studies that tell us once they start smoking marijuana their iq drops significantly. their sports activities decline, their mathematical skills decline. and in fact, here is something that's amazing, it exacerbates their mental capacity, in other words, if they have some mental disabilities, it heightens it and so, we are not taking care of our teens because we want taxes, we want money. >> kelly: oh, i see. you want to do more. bishop there are 18 states out there, including the district of columbia that allow the smoking of marijuana for medicinal purposes. let me go beyond that, what can you do to stem the tide and make people aware of the harmful effects of marijuana use? >> well, we first have to talk to the parents. i want to talk directly to the parents this morning if you allow me. parents, all teens are not smoking marijuana don't believe the hype that marijuana is okay. it's a very harmful drug, you have to talk to your teen. although 18 states said it's medical and teens are buying into that, you must sit dow
in 2 1/2 years. and barnes & noble chairs rallying over british publishing and education company pearson says it will invest $85.9 million in nook media in exchange for a 5% equity stake. >>> well, houston's port is a big employer and a very busy one, one of the busiest in the world, but it could be stalled by a labor strike that threatens the city, as well as more than a dozen others along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast. annise parker is the mayor of houston. mayor parker, great to have you with us. >> glad to be with you. >> your port handles about 70% of the shipping container business along the gulf coast, so this could be a major blow how will it impact your city, exactly? >> of our nine terminals, two are container terminals, and it will shut those down. 70 to 150 workers will be not showing up to work, will shut down access to those terminals now. we will continue to do business through our other terminals, but it could have a really severe and immediate impact on not just what happens at the port, but this is about cargo moving to other places. so it's everything up
gun training classes to educators. more than 50 people have signed up. teachers are not allowed to have guns on campuses there but an accu-weather lawmaker says he is writing a bill looking to give teachers that opportunity. >>> solano county sheriff's deputies say they believe a woman and her ex-boyfriend hid his father's body for two years ago so they could keep receiving pension benefits. his body was found in an apartment complex backyard in vallejo. deputies arrested his son and ex girlfriend earlier this week but since released. the district attorney has not yet filed charges pending further investigation. >>> a man accused of both sexually assaulting his patients and performing illegal cosmetic procedures has been ordered to stand trial. prosecutors say 49-year-old carlos guzman garza did not have a medical license when he conducted medical procedures including facelifts and liposuction at a clinic in san francisco's mission district. some of his patients also say they were sexually assaulted. he faces up to 30 years in prison if convicted on all counts. >>> a ban on a c
work with others around the country who have a lot more education than me and we work with cornell food physiologist who's helping quantify the nutrient density of our vegetables. we start with the ground up. a lot more complex, a lot more vitamins in the ground. we take care of the plants like they're children. we nurture them we study them as they're growing and it's anazing the results. >> and a lot of work. >> a lot of work. >> briefly who would you have this fabulous dinner with? >> my wife. my wife. >> you should have her here. >> i don't see her enough during that holiday season. >> you can toast her. happy new year's to your wife to micoh. happy new year's and thanks so much. for david bouley and the dish head to our website cbsnews.com/cbsthismorning. >> don't go away. we'll be right back. you're watching "cbs this morning saturday." "this is george. he is a good little monkey and always very curious. one day george got an important letter. he's built a rocket ship to travel into space." google, how far is earth to the moon? the moon is 238,900 miles... "
dumbs. they talk about the economy, jobs, the climate, education and things that matter and they don't use the kind of language that we use in our campaign because they're scared or turn off the voters in the middle. at the center that since we don't like mandatory anything now come to be a champion of the mega millions lottery where your ticket is your voting stock of coming and if you look at the last mega millions where people camped out three days in advance to be given to get a ticket where of course let's face it the chance of winning was less than being struck by lightning twice in a day put a few hundred million dollars into this and we will up their turnout significantly. i think they are an easier way to move in a direction and a lot of things can be done. we have to do some changes in the system including the filibuster. >> can i add a word? >> i fifa to questions go to get their. how to make it better and isn't it the public's fault after dhaka? i think they fit very well together. if you have a mismatch, if you have ideologically polarized parties operating in a separati
on friday at 5:30 p.m. eastern. if you want more education about currencies, go to currency class at money in motion.cnbc.com. >> an article in today's "new york times" finds once traditional dating priorities like having a good job, physical chemistry, may not matter if your credit score is less than attractive. the "times" interviewed more than 50 daters all around the u.s. they were all under 40 years old. brings us to this morning's squawk on the tweet. what's the most important financial question to ask on a first date. tweet us @squawk street. are we getting any responses? >> i don't know. can you imagine opening up that conversation? so, what's your credit score? are you using experian or transunion? >> i would expect you to do that on a date. >> what? why would you select me? i feel like that's not a compliment. >> this is a question you ask when you're over 40. the responders in that were all under 40. >> that's true. more to do with maybe a nest egg, so to speak, right? >> you can be more reckless. >> oh, yeah. >> london, here we come. >> retailers feeling the effect of slow holi
, and research laboratories, educational situations, they're looking all over the country at what a sort of mindless 10% cut means or whatever. so they are really at the point of wanting some spes if ity and having someone look at, should we do this program or that program? and that's really what the congressman's going to have to do. >> yeah. i just -- i wonder how that shifts things now? because the narrative right now, and maybe the public will buy it right now, is that the republicans have been obstructionist about the tax issue. once we get past january 1st and you get everything you want, you won't even have to argue about $400,000, $500,000, $1 million. i don't know really if the president has had any reason to negotiate in good faith. >> he knew we were going over -- he knew he could get back to 39.6, and you saw geithner. in fact, congressman, i think we should have learned from this. check out this quick sound bite. >> is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. again, there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)